5 Reasons to Move to the Cloud in 2013

by Shyam Oza

Cloud has been a buzzword for some time now, sharing a warm, comfy place in our hearts right next to social, big data, and gamification. Year after year we feel as if we’ve truly crossed Gartner Research’s infamous trough of disillusionment as described in its annual Hype Cycles, a graphic representation of maturity, adoption, and social application of specific technologies.

But we always find ourselves disappointed. What is changing in 2013? What is going to reignite those discussions in the boardroom and between the CIO and CTO?

Let’s take a quick look at why cloud is going to cross that trough in 2013, and interestingly enough, why Microsoft SharePoint and the rest of the Microsoft Office stack could lead the charge.

#1: Cost Savings

Your users are complaining about poor performance, your hard disks are at capacity, and your CEO won’t stop talking about big data and the next big thing. You know exactly how to get them there, except you’ve also been told you’re on a tight budget. Moving to the cloud ensures you’re going to eliminate infrastructure and maintenance costs - most importantly the indirect costs of staffing, real estate, and power. Many organizations forget that value doesn’t just come from cutting costs, but optimizing your available resources as well.          

#2: Predictability

Anyone managing budgets likes certainty. Uncertainty and complexity are factors IT is historically, or notoriously, known for introducing to the business. Shifting from a capital expenditure (CAPEX) model to an operational expenditure (OPEX) model is something that's extremely beneficial for budgetary purposes, and leveraging technology platforms such as Microsoft Office 365, which offers per-user, per-month rates, is an easy way to do so.

#3: Latest and Greatest Features

Organizations looking for the quickest updates and access to the latest features should look nowhere else but the cloud. Microsoft, among many vendors, has made it very clear that it will iterate aggressively against their cloud offerings before merging the functionality into the on-premises based cousins. An unprecedented three-month release cycle for SharePoint Online gives it a significant appeal over the on-premises version of the platform, which will still follow the standard “big bang” release cycle of Service Packs. This means that customers-- especially those using plans below the Enterprise Edition-- will be long salivating for features their cloud-based cousins are already enjoying.

#4: Ability to Simplify and Refocus

Managing the software and services consumed by day-to-day users is not as simple as acquiring a few licenses and installing applications on their local machines. Using Microsoft products and technologies as an example, email still requires a working knowledge of an infrastructure for Exchange; leveraging office web apps within SharePoint on-premises will require its own application server; growth of an organization or new initiatives, such as BYOD, within the organization introduce new challenges and tasks for IT to manage and stretch vital resources even further. Consolidating infrastructure management, email, collaboration, and project management under the Office 365 umbrella as well as eliminating the need for day-to-day maintenance and patch management greatly optimizes the IT workload and allows your team to focus on tasks such as education, on-boarding of new users, and development of business applications.

#5: Rebuilt with Cloud in Mind

Microsoft’s Business Productivity Online Standard Suite (BPOS) and v14 of Office 365 were early iterations. The systems often went down, features were lacking, and there weren’t many people using the platform simply out of a lack of understanding of compliance and security implications. The latest release of Office 365, v15, was built with cloud in mind, and the platform is as rich and robust as its on-premises cousin could be. Microsoft has made it very clear where its roadmap is, and has brought on board many major players like Toyota, Aviva, and Energizer to ensure every company – from one user to 100,000 – will have a place in the cloud.

Shyam Oza is a Senior Product Manager at AvePoint, working directly with global organizations - many of which are in the Fortune 500 - on crafting new deployment strategies utilizing hybrid and cloud environments with Microsoft technologies. His expertise and passion for being at the leading edge of new application delivery models, including mobile and social, has garnered him speaking opportunities throughout the country.

Discuss this Blog Entry 1

on Dec 19, 2013

One of the issues many larger companies face is not really under discussion namely the CAPEX versus OPEX budgeting issue. To many large companies CAPEX is good and OPEX is bad because company policy is to restrict OPEX and encourage CAPEX instead.

Has anyone got any ideas on how to CAPEX an ongoing monthly subscription cost?

It is easier for companies to spend their cash on buying servers/software etc because it is CAPEX.

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